Hereditary, health, and lifestyle risk factors

Statins may stop prostate cancer’s return

A 2010 study finds that statins, a class of drugs taken to lower cholesterol, may prevent prostate cancer from recurring after surgery.

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Infertility may raise risk of aggressive prostate cancer

A 2010 study of more than 22,500 California men found that being infertile significantly raised the risk of developing aggressive disease.

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Prostate cancer risk in African Americans

African American men have, by far, the highest incidence of prostate cancer in the world. They are also more than twice as likely to die of the disease as white American men. No single factor — diet, obesity, socioeconomic status, or biology — accounts for the disparity, and the search for an explanation continues.

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Blood calcium levels may be linked to prostate cancer death

Research finds that men with high blood calcium levels are more likely to develop fatal prostate cancer than men with lower blood calcium levels.

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Diabetes inversely related to prostate cancer risk

Two studies conclude that men with diabetes have a lower risk of prostate cancer than nondiabetics, suggesting a potential biological link between the conditions.

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Does frequent ejaculation help ward off prostate cancer?

Studies show that ejaculating often may help protect against prostate cancer.

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Can a vasectomy increase prostate cancer risk?

Experts conclude that there is no association between vasectomy and prostate cancer risk.

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Breast cancer genes pose threat to prostate health, too

Research shows that men who carry the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes are at higher risk of developing prostate cancer than men without the genes.

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Gene combination raises prostate cancer risk

A Swedish study finds that the combination of five genetic variations increases the risk of developing prostate cancer.

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Testosterone seen unrelated to prostate cancer risk

A 2008 study refutes the potential link between high testosterone levels and increased risk of disease.

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